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My name is Kate and I'm an editor at Blue Mountain Arts in Boulder, Colorado, whom I'm representing on this page. We publish greeting cards and gift items featuring original free verse poetry. One of my assignments is to find ways to get the word out about our need for poetry submissions to use on our greeting cards. I post on a lot of job boards, but I'm also trying to reach writers in other ways. Hence, this LJ page.

Here's our general call for submissions: 


Blue
Mountain
Arts is interested in reviewing writings for publication on greeting cards. We are looking for highly original and creative submissions on friendship, family, special occasions, positive living, and other topics one person might want to share with another person. Submissions may also be considered for inclusion in book anthologies. We pay $300 per poem for all rights to publish it on a greeting card and $50 if your poem is used only in an anthology. To request a copy of our writer’s guidelines (which include contact/submission information), please send a blank e-mail to writings@sps.com with “Send Me Guidelines” in the subject line, or write us at: Blue Mountain Arts, Inc. Editorial Department P.O. Box 1007 Boulder, CO 80306. You can also visit our Web site at www.sps.com. 

Please feel free to check out the website. If you're interested, send out the e-mail and get a copy of the submission guidelines -- and you should especially note the part about how we aren't looking for rhyming poetry. Also, before you send anything in, stop and think about whether it would work on a greeting card of the feel-good variety (we don't do the bitter and sarcastic type here!). Other than that, I can guarantee that we at Blue Mountain Arts would love to read your work.

In the meantime, please check out my weekly Editor's Tip (usually posted on Fridays), meant to help anyone who's interested in submitting work to any publisher get a leg up on little things that will give an editor a good impression.

Also, check us out on Facebook: The Blue Mountain Arts Backyard

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

When sending a submission to a publisher of any kind, you need to keep one thing in mind: You’re sending your work to someone who is trained to know how to use the English language — punctuation, grammar, etc. Showing that you care about these things shows respect to the person who will be reading your work, with the added benefit of making yourself look professional. The Editor’s Tip is meant to help authors understand how to leave an editor with a positive impression, which can be an enormous advantage for them.

Today I’d like to talk about a very serious topic among editors.

 

Editor's Tip: PlagiarismCollapse )

 


 
 
 
 
 
 

When sending a submission to a publisher of any kind, you need to keep one thing in mind: You’re sending your work to someone who is trained to know how to use the English language — punctuation, grammar, etc. Showing that you care about these things shows respect to the person who will be reading your work, with the added benefit of making yourself look professional. The Editor’s Tip is meant to help authors understand how to leave an editor with a positive impression, which can be an enormous advantage for them.

 A few days ago, I opened a submission that came through the mail, read it, and then went to the bathroom and scrubbed my hands. Why? Because the submitter of the poem was a smoker. The paper reeked of smoke and the smell rubbed onto my hands. That experience is not entirely unusual, and not pleasant for any editor. I’ve discussed clean copies before, but it has been a while, and I find myself inspired to review the information.

 

Editor's Tip: Clean CopiesCollapse )
 
 
 
 
 
 

When sending a submission to a publisher of any kind, you need to keep one thing in mind: You’re sending your work to someone who is trained to know how to use the English language — punctuation, grammar, etc. Showing that you care about these things shows respect to the person who will be reading your work, with the added benefit of making yourself look professional. The Editor’s Tip is meant to help authors understand how to leave an editor with a positive impression, which can be an enormous advantage for them.

 A few months ago, I received a query about our poetry contest asking if we require our submissions to have punctuation. I thought I’d address that answer today.

 

Editor's Tip: Punctuation in PoetryCollapse )

 


 
 
 
 
 
 

When sending a submission to a publisher of any kind, you need to keep one thing in mind: You’re sending your work to someone who is trained to know how to use the English language — punctuation, grammar, etc. Showing that you care about these things shows respect to the person who will be reading your work, with the added benefit of making yourself look professional. The Editor’s Tip is meant to help authors understand how to leave an editor with a positive impression, which can be an enormous advantage for them.

 While reading entries to our poetry contest yesterday, I noted a few things to talk about today.

 

Editor's Tip: Miscellaneous EntriesCollapse )

 


 
 
 
 
 
 

When sending a submission to a publisher of any kind, you need to keep one thing in mind: You’re sending your work to someone who is trained to know how to use the English language — punctuation, grammar, etc. Showing that you care about these things shows respect to the person who will be reading your work, with the added benefit of making yourself look professional. The Editor’s Tip is meant to help authors understand how to leave an editor with a positive impression, which can be an enormous advantage for them.

 

Today I’m going to touch on a few commonly misused words.

 

 

Editor's Tip: Miscellaneous Misused WordsCollapse )
 
 
 
 
 
 

When sending a submission to a publisher of any kind, you need to keep one thing in mind: You’re sending your work to someone who is trained to know how to use the English language — punctuation, grammar, etc. Showing that you care about these things shows respect to the person who will be reading your work, with the added benefit of making yourself look professional. The Editor’s Tip is meant to help authors understand how to leave an editor with a positive impression, which can be an enormous advantage for them.

Today I’d like to discuss an article I recently read on the New York Times website.

 

Read more...Collapse )Editor's Tip: Don't Disregard the RulesCollapse )

 


 
 
 
 
 
 

When sending a submission to a publisher of any kind, you need to keep one thing in mind: You’re sending your work to someone who is trained to know how to use the English language — punctuation, grammar, etc. Showing that you care about these things shows respect to the person who will be reading your work, with the added benefit of making yourself look professional. The Editor’s Tip is meant to help authors understand how to leave an editor with a positive impression, which can be an enormous advantage for them.

 Happy Friday, everyone. It’s good to be back. Today I’d like to talk about conclusions and how important they are.

 

Editor's Tip: ConclusionsCollapse )

 


 
 
 
 
 
 

I regret that I haven't been posting my regular Editor's Tips. Between our sales meeting (a big success, by the way) and a series of Friday conficts, it has been difficult to find the time. Today is my last day at work in 2009, but I am happy to say that the Editor's Tip will return in January.

In the meantime, please have a healthy and happy holiday season.


 
 
 
 
 
 
Hello, everybody.

We have a big meeting for our Sales Representatives coming up in a few weeks. Some of us are very busy preparing for it. I am one of those — I have become the default image scanner/PowerPoint creator/video editor, among other things. A few moments ago I realized that I have run out of time to write my editor’s tip today. I apologize profusely.


My tips may have to be deferred until after the meeting — we’ll see. I’ll take each Friday as it comes. Thanks for understanding!